Search Results for: start up nation

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You'll Thank Me for This

You'll Thank Me for This

A pulse-pounding psychological thriller based on the popular Dutch tradition of blindfolding and dropping teens and pre-teens in the middle of a forest — and what happens when it goes horribly wrong.
 
Twelve-year old Karin is blindfolded and dropped into the Hoge Veluwe National Forest with three other children. With nothing but a few basic supplies and emergency food, the children are tasked with working together to navigate one of the Netherlands' most beautiful and wild locations and return to where their families are anxiously waiting.
 
Karin quickly finds herself at odds with two of the older teens, and suddenly looks up to see that the other children have vanished. As Karin struggles against the elements to find her way back, she soon realizes that something far more sinister lurks in the woods.
 
Grace, Karin’s mother and an American married to a Dutch husband, has been nervous about this practice from the start. At first she tells herself the space is good for her daughter, but as the hours begin to tick by and the children fail to arrive at their designated campsite, she becomes certain something has gone horribly wrong. 
 
As Karin fights for survival, and Grace hastens to find her daughter, the night culminates in the reveal of a deadly secret—and a shocking confrontation—that will push each of them to her edge.
You Can Do Anything

You Can Do Anything

In a tech-dominated world, the most needed degrees are the most surprising: the liberal arts.

Did you take the right classes in college? Will your major help you get the right job offers? For more than a decade, the national spotlight has focused on science and engineering as the only reliable choice for finding a successful post-grad career. Our destinies have been reduced to a caricature: learn to write computer code or end up behind a counter, pouring coffee. Quietly, though, a different path to success has been taking shape.

In You Can Do Anything, George Anders explains the remarkable power of a liberal arts education – and the ways it can open the door to thousands of cutting-edge jobs every week.

The key insight: curiosity, creativity, and empathy aren’t unruly traits that must be reined in. You can be yourself, as an English major, and thrive in sales. You can segue from anthropology into the booming new field of user research; from classics into management consulting, and from philosophy into high-stakes investing. At any stage of your career, you can bring a humanist’s grace to our rapidly evolving high-tech future. And if you know how to attack the job market, your opportunities will be vast.

In this book, you will learn why resume-writing is fading in importance and why “telling your story” is taking its place. You will learn how to create jobs that don’t exist yet, and to translate your campus achievements into a new style of expression that will make employers’ eyes light up. You will discover why people who start in eccentric first jobs – and then make their own luck – so often race ahead of peers whose post-college hunt focuses only on security and starting pay. You will be ready for anything.
White American Youth

White American Youth

As featured on Fresh Air and the TED stage, a stunning look inside the world of violent hate groups by a onetime white supremacist leader who, shaken by a personal tragedy, abandoned his destructive life to become an anti-hate activist.

Raw, inspiring, and heartbreakingly candid, White American Youth explores why so many young people lose themselves in a culture of hatred and violence and how the criminal networks they forge terrorize and divide our nation. The story begins when Picciolini found himself stumbling through high school, struggling to find a community among other fans of punk rock music. There, he was recruited by a notorious white power skinhead leader and encouraged to fight with the movement to “protect the white race from extinction.” Soon, he had become an expert in racist philosophies, a terror who roamed the neighborhood, quick to throw fists. When his mentor was sent to prison, sixteen-year-old Picciolini took over the man’s role as the leader of an infamous neo-Nazi skinhead group.

Seduced by the power he accrued through intimidation, and swept up in the rhetoric he had adopted, Picciolini worked to grow an army of extremists. He used music as a recruitment tool, launching his own propaganda band that performed at white power rallies around the world. But slowly, as he started a family of his own and a job that for the first time brought him face to face with people from all walks of life, he began to recognize the cracks in his hateful ideology. Then a shocking loss at the hands of racial violence changed his life forever, and Picciolini realized too late the full extent of the harm he’d caused.

“Simultaneously horrifying and redemptive” (AlterNet), White American Youth examines how radicalism and racism can conquer a person’s way of life and how we can work together to stop those ideologies from tearing our world apart.

*An earlier edition of this book was published as Romantic Violence
We May Dominate the World

We May Dominate the World

When the United States senses an existential threat, how do we respond? And what can the patterns of the past tell us about the challenges we face today? This is the untold story of how US foreign policy was born.

Starting in the early 1900s, the United States went on a regional rampage of breathtaking scope and scale. There were coups and counter-coups, protectorates and annexations. Invasions were followed by occupations, and occupations by insurgencies and counter-insurgencies. Foreign capitals became accustomed to U.S. Marines policing their streets and U.S. warships patrolling their waters. By the mid 20th Century the  country had claimed control or influence over all of their rivals in the Western hemisphere, achieving what no other modern nation achieved: regional hegemony. 

In We May Dominate the World, Sean Mirski presents a vivid history of US foreign intervention that has stark lessons for today. From 1900 to 1933 the US took diplomatic and military actions in over seven countries, and landed forces in Latin America more than three dozen times, an average of almost two new expeditions every year. Chronicling the rise of this interest abroad from the years just after the Civil War up until the outbreak of WWII, Mirski exposes a key chapter in US history where reckless actions abroad were driven by bouts of instability and often met with lasting, detrimental outcomes.

Written with a policy analyst’s eye for pattern and detail and a writer’s eye for narrative and character, We May Dominate the World  highlights how America has historically responded to existential threats and how that legacy is now playing out in the present. Rather than altruism or even imperialism, this era of foreign intervention emphasizes that instability, or the threat of instability, has always been a key motivator in US foreign policy. As our relations with adversarial nations like North Korea and Iran grow increasingly unpredictable, and as China consolidates its own regional dominance, presenting an entirely new kind of threat to US interests, this book urges us to take stock of the strategies available to us and learn from our past. 
This Land that I Love

This Land that I Love

February, 1940: After a decade of worldwide depression, World War II had begun in Europe and Asia. With Germany on the march, and Japan at war with China, the global crisis was in a crescendo. America’s top songwriter, Irving Berlin, had captured the nation’s mood a little more than a year before with his patriotic hymn, “God Bless America.”

Woody Guthrie was having none of it. Near-starving and penniless, he was traveling from Texas to New York to make a new start. As he eked his way across the country by bus and by thumb, he couldn’t avoid Berlin’s song. Some people say that it was when he was freezing by the side of the road in a Pennsylvania snowstorm that he conceived of a rebuttal. It would encompass the dark realities of the Dust Bowl and Great Depression, and it would begin with the lines: “This land is your land, this land is my land.”

In This Land That I Love, John Shaw writes the dual biography of these beloved American songs. Examining the lives of their authors, he finds that Guthrie and Berlin had more in common than either could have guessed. Though Guthrie’s image was defined by train-hopping, Irving Berlin had also risen from homelessness, having worked his way up from the streets of New York.

At the same time, This Land That I Love sheds new light on our patriotic musical heritage, from “Yankee Doodle” and “The Star-Spangled Banner” to Martin Luther King’s recitation from “My Country ‘Tis of Thee” on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in August 1963. Delving into the deeper history of war songs, minstrelsy, ragtime, country music, folk music, and African American spirituals, Shaw unearths a rich vein of half-forgotten musical traditions. With the aid of archival research, he uncovers new details about the songs, including a never-before-printed verse for “This Land Is Your Land.” The result is a fascinating narrative that refracts and re-envisions America’s tumultuous history through the prism of two unforgettable anthems.
Things I Should Have Said

Things I Should Have Said

Now a National Bestseller!

In this intimate memoir, actress and musician Jamie Lynn Spears opens up for the first time, telling her unfiltered story on her own terms.
 
You’ve read the headlines, but you don’t know Jamie Lynn Spears. The world first met Jamie Lynn as a child star, when it was her job to perform, both on set and for the press. She spent years escaping into different characters on All That and Zoey 101. But as she grew up, faced a teen pregnancy, raised her daughter on her own, pursued a career, and learned to stand on her own two feet, the real Jamie Lynn started to take center stage– a raw, blemished, and imperfect woman, standing in her own power.

Despite growing up in one of America's most tabloid-famous families, Jamie Lynn has never told her story in her own words. In Things I Should Have Said, she talks frankly about the highs and lows, sharing what it was like traveling the world as a kid, how she moved into acting and performing herself, what life as a child star took from her, and the life-changing reality of becoming a teen mom. She talks about how she finally found love and how the mistakes she has made have taught her more than anything else. She also shares vulnerably about how the ATV accident that nearly took her daughter's life brought her back to her faith and caused her to reevaluate and redirect her life.
 
Frank, courageous, and inspiring, Things I Should Have Said is a portrait of a wife, momma, sister, daughter, actress, and musician doing the best she could to show up for herself and teach her daughters to have the courage to love every part of themselves, too.
The Washingtonienne

The Washingtonienne

The Capitol Hill aide who scandalized Washington, D.C., with her blog has now written a sharp, steamy, utterly unrepentant novel set against the backdrop of the nation’s capitol.

When Jacqueline Turner’s fiancÉ gives her two days to move out of his apartment, she has no choice but to leave New York City and crash with her best friend in Washington, D.C. She needs an exciting new life–not to mention real employment. Where better to get a fresh start than the nation’s capitol?

Alas, D.C. turns out to be a lot more buttoned-up and toned down than she’d hoped. It’s a town where a girl has to make her own excitement–and Jacqueline Turner is just the woman for the job.

From the married presidential appointee who gives her cash after each tryst to the lascivious Georgetown lawyer who parades her around like something out of Pretty Woman, Jackie’s roster of paramours grows so complicated that her friends ask her to start a blog so they can keep up. But in a small town like Washington, the line between private and public blurs very easily, and Jackie quickly realizes this blog idea may be more than she bargained for.

Deliciously gossipy and impossible to put down, The Washingtonienne is every bit as steamy and outrageous as the real-life exploits that inspired it.
The Unexpected President

The Unexpected President

When President James Garfield was shot in 1881, nobody expected Vice President Chester A. Arthur to become a strong and effective president, a courageous anti-corruption reformer, and an early civil rights advocate.


Despite his promising start as a young man, by his early fifties Chester A. Arthur was known as the crooked crony of New York machine boss Roscoe Conkling. For years Arthur had been perceived as unfit to govern, not only by critics and the vast majority of his fellow citizens but by his own conscience. As President James A. Garfield struggled for his life, Arthur knew better than his detractors that he failed to meet the high standard a president must uphold.

And yet, from the moment President Arthur took office, he proved to be not just honest but brave, going up against the very forces that had controlled him for decades. He surprised everyone — and gained many enemies — when he swept house and took on corruption, civil rights for blacks, and issues of land for Native Americans.

A mysterious young woman deserves much of the credit for Arthur’s remarkable transformation. Julia Sand, a bedridden New Yorker, wrote Arthur nearly two dozen letters urging him to put country over party, to find “the spark of true nobility” that lay within him. At a time when women were barred from political life, Sand’s letters inspired Arthur to transcend his checkered past–and changed the course of American history.

This beautifully written biography tells the dramatic, untold story of a virtually forgotten American president. It is the tale of a machine politician and man-about-town in Gilded Age New York who stumbled into the highest office in the land, only to rediscover his better self when his nation needed him.
The Only Way to Win

The Only Way to Win

Why Winning with Character Is the Only Way to Win The conditioning begins early in our lives. Great achievements will bring lasting happiness and fulfillment; great achievements form the bedrock of stable self-esteem and strong character; great achievements will become the foundation for a successful life. If these well-intentioned promises are true, why does winning never seem to be enough? In The Only Way to Win, Jim Loehr draws upon two decades of work with Fortune 500 executives; world-class athletes such as Monica Seles, Dan Jansen, and Eric Lindros; and other high achievers at the Human Performance Institute (HPI) to reveal surprising insights about achievement motivation. Specifically, Loehr finds that the blind pursuit of external achievement often results in emptiness, addiction, and, ironically, poor performance. It’s not really about what you achieve, he argues, it’s about who you become as a consequence of the chase. As Loehr powerfully demonstrates, success at work and fulfillment in life require a complete re-purposing of achievement, one where value is derived from growth in areas such as integrity, honesty, gratefulness, humility, optimism, and compassion. To help readers start this process, he provides them with the tools they need to develop these character traits, as well as the plan they need to use them effectively. A compelling, practical, and hopeful read filled with relatable stories and useful exercises, The Only Way to Win will serve as a powerful wake-up call for business leaders, employees, teachers, and coaches. It will also provide inspiration for readers looking to perform better, achieve more, and change both their own lives and those of the people they influence. Jim Loehr is a world-renowned performance psychologist, co-founder of the Human Performance Institute, and author of fifteen books, including his most recent, The Power of Story. He also co-authored the national bestseller The Power of Full Engagement.
The Newspaper Club: The Cubs Get the Scoop

The Newspaper Club: The Cubs Get the Scoop

Tag along with a rambunctious group of kid reporters as they fight for their right to run a newspaper in this exciting book from an award-winning author.

The Cub Report is up and running and getting great response in the sleepy town of Bear Creek, Maine. But when Gordon snaps a photo of an escaped prisoner who is caught in a pigpen, things quickly take a turn for Nellie and her staff. While Nellie fights off jealousy at all the national media attention Gordon is receiving (even from Ellen!) for his amazing shot, the other Cubs are breaking away as parents start questioning the safety (and validity) of a kid-run independent newspaper. But when Gordon's mom and a reporter from another town's newspaper try to shut down The Cub Report for good, Nellie, Gordon, and the club must set aside their issues to save their right to report the news.

Award-winning author Beth Vrabel tackles the topic of who should report the news while also focusing on themes of friendship, jealousy, and teamwork in the second book in The Newspaper Club series.
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